Meet the Cast of The Winter's Tale! Spotlight on Lucas Serby (Clown/Lord)

July 15, 2018

Lucas Serby gets to clown around in The Winter's Tale - literally. He kicks off the much-needed comic relief at the start of the second act as the adopted brother of a lost princess (spoilers!) who has...more than doting fond lady friend.

 

An unrelated fun fact about Lucas: he can rap in multiple languages (though unfortunately we can't promise you'll see all three in The Winter's Tale). 

 

 

What's your favorite thing about your hometown? 

How beautiful it is in the summer.

 

What does your ideal Saturday look like?

My ideal Saturday is very relaxed. Sleeping in, going out in the sun to read, and hanging out with friends later during the evening at a bar or pub. That, or a beach day.

 

What's your favorite role you've played, Shakespeare or otherwise?

My favourite role, I think, would actually be young Will Shakespeare in the play A Cry of Players. Such a well-written play and I wish I could do it again.

 

What excites you about The Winter's Tale?

I'm very excited about playing the Clown, as I think I'm going to have a lot of fun with him. I think we're going to get along very well.

 

 

Featuring a mad king, an exit pursued by a bear, and three of Shakespeare's strongest female characters, The Winter's Tale is a lesser-known, lesser-told story that gives us both tragedy and comedy, love and loss, winter and spring.

 

The Winter's Tale performs July 20, 21, 27, 28 at 7pm and July 29 at 5pm at the Alchemical Theatre Laboratory.  Tickets may be purchased in advance here

 

About Classics on the Rocks:

Shakespeare doesn't have to be complicated and it's our mission at Classics on the Rocks to make classical theatre accessible, exciting, palatable, and fun for everyone - whether you're brand new to Shakespeare or have read the canon cover to cover. 

 

At Classics on the Rocks, we believe that just as whiskey doesn't need anything more than rocks to tame it's bite. Shakespeare doesn't need fancy concepts, modernizations, frilly costumes, or big sets to make it relatable. All you need are talented actors who trust the text and tell the story. It's classics served simply on the rocks.